Bullseye Pistol

Bullseye is a precision pistol sport traditionally shot one-handed at 25 and 50 yards. It is typically shot with one to three categories of pistol: .22 rimfire, centerfire, and a 1911 chambered in .45 ACP.

How does it work?

A single competition is typically separated into four matches: Slow Fire, Timed Fire, Rapid Fire, and the National Match.

A Slow Fire match consists of two sets of ten shots at a 50 yard target (or scaled 25 yard equivalent), with ten minutes to complete each set.

A Timed Fire match consists of two sets of ten shots at a 25 yard target, with each set split into two strings of five shots with 20 seconds per string.

A Rapid Fire match consists of two sets of ten shots at a 25 yard target, with each set split into two strings of five shots with 10 seconds per string.

A National Match consists of three sets of ten shots, each corresponding to a single set from a Slow Fire, Timed Fire, and Rapid Fire match.

25 yard Timed and Rapid Fire target center
25 yard scaled Slow Fire target

Typical range commands are as follows:

  1. A description of the course of fire is given. Example: "This is a string of timed fire. Five shots in twenty seconds."
  2. The command to load is given. Example: "With a magazine of five rounds, load."
  3. Marksmen are then asked if they are prepared. Example: "Is the line ready?"
  4. If no one indicates that they need additional time, the match director continues with: "The line is ready. Ready on the right, ready on the left, ready on the firing line."
  5. The command to fire is either given verbally with the command "Fire," or by the sounding of a buzzer.
  6. At end of the alloted time, the command "Cease Fire" is given, or a buzzer sounds.

Each shot in a competition has a maximum score of 10, so the maximum score for a single competition is 900 points. The center-most ring of the target (the bullseye) is used for tie-breaking purposes. If a shot crosses the boundary between two score rings, the higher score is counted.


Left-handed marksman using a typical one-handed shooting stance
At the El Paso Gun Club, we host two "900" matches of any category each Wednesday. We start each competition with the Slow Fire match, followed by the National Match, then the Timed Fire match, and end with the Rapid Fire match. There is no "winner," per se. Instead, when marksmen beat their previous top score, they can get half of their entry fees for that competition returned to them.

Similarly, even though Bullseye is traditionally played one-handed, we allow two-handed shooting. Your only "competition" is against yourself. We want you to enjoy yourself and improve your skills! You do not need to be a member to come to any of our matches. Our gate will be open for you.

If you would like to know more about Bullseye, this website is a great resource for the sport.